New York Medical College

About NYMC

Community Outreach

Community Outreach

LEND Program

A well-regarded program known as LEND, which stands for Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities, is a nationwide, interdisciplinary training program for health professionals who work with children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. It also serves parents and siblings of individuals with disabilities and other special health care needs.

LEND’s nine-month curriculum provides an overview of neurodevelopmental disabilities, as well as seminars in leadership skills and evidence-based research methods. Faculty and trainees come from a dozen core academic disciplines like pediatrics, audiology, nursing, psychology, social work, physical therapy and speech-language pathology. Read more...

STAR Program

The STAR (Summer Trainees in Academic Research) Program is a new initiative at NYMC aimed at enhancing the research experience of the many high school students, undergraduates, medical students and others who conduct mentored scientific investigations in our labs over the summer. Students have the opportunity to attend a series of lectures on various aspects of scientific life and to develop the communication skills essential to a career in research through participation in the STAR Research Forum. Read more...

Mentoring at-risk Youth

Every Thursday at 6 p.m. for the past two years, a group of about 16 first- and second year medical students, a Ph.D. candidate and a master’s student, alternating weekly in groups of 8, ring the buzzer of the secure detention center for youths, leave their book bags and purses in a locked room, and allow themselves to be escorted into a guarded, secure cafeteria.

There they play games, paint murals, judge rap offs, and just talk to the young people there, who range in age from 10 to 18 and for whom an average stay is about 25 days.

Nobody gives their full names, nobody talks about the crimes they are accused of and for at least an hour every week, the gap lessens. Read more…

La Casita de la Salud

La Casita de la Salud is an inner-city health clinic run by New York Medical College medical students. Located at 413 East 120th Street in Manhattan, the clinic is dedicated to serving the uninsured population of East Harlem. La Casita operates as an adjunct to an existing satellite clinic of Metropolitan Hospital Center, La Clinica del Barrio. Hours are on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

The goal of the medical student founders of the clinic was, and still is, to improve health outcomes by providing quality culturally competent care regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, nationality, or ability to pay. The clinic emphasizes preventative medicine through patient-centered care and education, and strives to be a model of efficiency and cost-effectiveness in the achievement of the aforementioned goals. Through cultural competency and increasing access to healthcare for uninsured and undocumented residents, the clinic founders hope to help bridge the pervasive health disparity gap in our healthcare system.

Race for Rehab

Each year since 1999, when a group of physical therapy students in the School of Health Sciences and Practice were looking for a way to raise money for the Achilles International Track Club (AITC), the College has sponsored "Race for Rehab," a 5-kilometer and 400 meter run. Now in its 12th year, the Race for Rehab has raised awareness and money for the ATC, a worldwide organization that encourages people with physical disabilities to participate in running and exercising with the general public regardless of speed, level of ability or age. Held in the fall, the race pits athletes with disabilities against able-bodied runners. The benefits to athletes and spectators goes far beyond the money raised or the joy of competition.

Frontiers in Physiology

Each summer the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences (GSBMS) hosts a middle or high school life sciences teacher participating in the American Physiological Society's (APS) program Frontiers in Physiology. In fact, GSBMS Dean Francis L. Belloni, Ph.D., was a member of the APS team that first conceptualized, and later cultivated the highly successful national program. Today Dr. Belloni vigorously supports "Frontiers in Physiology"—just one of many ways that New York Medical College fosters the next generation of scientists.

Page updated: October 25, 2013