New York Medical College

Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences

Program Course Descriptions

 

PHARM 1000 Fundamentals of Pharmacology (2 credits) Dr. Stier (Summer)
(Previously offered as 500.2)

This course introduces the underlying principles of pharmacology and provides a perspective of the historical, regulatory (FDA) and industrial aspects of pharmacological science. This includes overviews of the physiological, biochemical, and anatomical foundations for the interaction of drugs and chemicals with biological systems. This course is intended to orient new graduate students to the general scope of pharmacologic science. Lectures: 4 hrs/wk. Letter-graded.

PHARM 1010, 1020 Pharmacology (8 credits) Dr. Stier
PHARM 1010 Part I (4 credits) (Fall)
PHARM 1020 Part II (4 credits) (Spring)
(Previously offered as 521A.4, 521B.4)

This basic course in pharmacology introduces the student to concepts of the interactions of chemical agents with living tissues. The teaching of pharmacological principles and mechanisms is emphasized, but toxicology and therapeutics are also part of the program. Lectures: 4 hrs/wk. Letter-graded.

PHARM 1410 Pharmacology (8 credits) Dr. Powers and Staff (Spring)
(Previously offered as 541.8)

This basic course in pharmacology is taken with the sophomore medical student class, introducing the student to the basic concepts of the interactions of chemical agents with living tissues. Demonstrations performed by the graduate students are presented to illustrate basic pharmacological principles and exemplify the therapeutic and toxic actions of important drugs and poisons. The teaching of basic pharmacology is emphasized, but toxicology and therapeutics are also part of the course. Letter-graded. Open to Ph.D. students only.

PHARM 2010 Drug Metabolism and Disposition (2 credits) Dr. Abraham
(Previously offered as 563.2)

The course teaches the basic principles of drug absorption, metabolism and pharmacodynamics, drug-drug interaction, and drug interactions with diet, including fat, carbohydrates, and proteins. These factors are important in drug disposition in the organs involved in biotransformation and metabolism. The emphasis will be on methodology, bioavailability, and other aspects of modern clinical and biotechnological pharmacology, such as drug-targeting in genetic disease (including sense and antisense drugs), methods of DNA drug delivery for altering protein and growth factor expression, and effects on drug action. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2030 Biochemical Pharmacology (2 credits) Dr. Balazy
(Previously offered as 572.2)

The cellular and molecular mechanisms of drug actions with emphasis on gene-based approaches will be studied. Biochemical laboratory techniques used in pharmacological research will be introduced. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2110 Selected Topics in Neuropharmacology (2 credits) Dr. Powers
(Previously offered as 545.2)

This course surveys selected areas of research areas of particular interest to modern neuropharmacology. This includes lectures on areas of basic neurobiology that underlie the actions of important pharmacological agents, or which relate to current efforts to develop novel therapeutic agents. Also includes are lectures covering the pharmacology of selected CNS-active agents which are of intense current interest to the medical community and general public; and lectures covering the pathophysiology of specific neurological or psychiatric disorders and the therapeutic actions and side effects of drugs used in treatment of these disorders. The course consists of a series of lectures on the subject matter selected; with appropriate reading assignments prepared by each lecturer relevant to the topic. Student performance is evaluated by two exams each covering half of the course and given equal weight. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2210 Pharmacology of Autacoids (2 credits) Drs. Quilley and Nasjletti
(Previously offered as 567.2)

This is a detailed analysis of the pharmacologic effects of naturally occurring autocrine and paracrine hormones (autacoids) including histamine, serotonin, angiotensin, kinins, substance P, growth factors, cytokines, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes. Questions to be addressed include the role of autacoids in basic physiology and their value as drugs or targets of drug action in various disease states. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2310 Endocrine Pharmacology (2 credits) Dr. Powers
(Previously offered as 555.2)

This course is concerned with the basic principles in the use of hormones as drugs. Lecture topics include neuroendocrinology, anterior and posterior pituitary hormones, thyroid diseases, treatment of diabetes, adrenal steroids, and reproductive hormones. Areas of research such as neuroendocrine peptides are also discussed. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2410 Cardiovascular Pharmacology-Drug Development (2 credits) Drs. Stier and Cervoni
(Previously offered as 562.2)

This course is a detailed presentation of the latest concepts concerning the mechanism of action of cardiovascular drugs. There is special consideration of new uses of established drugs, and recent additions to the therapeutic armamentarium. The course will survey the present status (especially theories of mechanism of action) of agents used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including angina pectoris, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hypertension and lipid abnormalities. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2510 Toxicology (2 credits) Dr. Conaway
(Previously offered as 566.2)

This general survey is approached from the biomedical viewpoint, but covers the broad field of toxicology, including acute and chronic toxicity, toxicokinetics, reproductive toxicology, teratogenicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Specific topics include drugs, metals, solvents, food additives, pesticides and herbicides, environmental pollution, radioactive chemicals, industrial exposure and forensic toxicology. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 2610 Genetic Pharmacology (2 credits) Dr. Abraham
(Previously offered as 568.2)

Introduction to the genetic basis of pharmacology and past, current and future gene therapy. Pharmacologic approaches to genetic manipulation in humans include somatic gene therapy, germline gene therapy, enhancement of gene engineering, and eugenic genetic engineering. The following topics will be covered: (1) non-viral gene transfer approaches: high-voltage electric fields, receptor-mediated gene transfer, microinjection of DNA, and the limitations of non-viral gene transfer; (2) viral gene transfer for human therapy; (3) functional genomics in genetic pharmacology and the application of ribozyme technology in the control of deleterious gene repression in the cardiovascular system; and (4) important examples of the use of gene therapy in cyctic fibrosis, angiogenesis and diabetes, hypertension, ischemia, breast cancer, and leukemia. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. PHARM-1010 or 1020 is a pre- or co-requisite.

PHARM 7010 Directed Readings in Pharmacology (1-2 credits) Dr. Stier
(Previously offered as 546.x.1-2)

This course is intended for advanced-level pharmacology Master’s students who wish to explore, in depth, a particular area of pharmacology. Under the guidance of a faculty member, students read the scientific literature in a field. Topics include: biochemical pharmacology, cardiovascular pharmacology, endocrine pharmacology, immunological pharmacology, molecular pharmacology, neural pharmacology, renal pharmacology, toxicology and more customized topics. Grades are based on examinations and written and oral reports. Independent study. Conferences: 1-2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. This course may be taken multiple times with a different topic each time.

PHARM 8010 Journal Club (1 credit) Dr. Wang (Fall and Spring)
(Previously offered as 591.1)

Students attend and participate in seminars given by graduate students, research staff or faculty. Each semester the student will present a seminar to the entire department. Seminar: 1hr/wk. Pass/Fail.

PHARM 8300 Laboratory Demonstrations (1 credit) Dr. Powers
(Previously offered as 551.1)

Pharmacology graduate students will be responsible for demonstrating experiments in the medical pharmacology course as assigned by a teaching staff member. Internship: hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail.

PHARM 9110 Survey of Research Techniques in Pharmacology (3 credits) Dr. Schwartzman (Fall and Spring)
(Previously offered as 570.3)

This course is intended to acquaint new graduate students in pharmacology with the research being carried out by departmental faculty. Students will rotate through the laboratories on an arranged schedule, observing and participating in research activities. Research. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail. Open to Ph.D. students only, who must take this course twice.

PHARM 9610 Practical Pharmacology (In Vitro Preparations) (2 credits) Dr. Quilley
(Previously offered as 569.2)

Experiments will be performed on standard pharmacological in vitro preparation to demonstrate the principles of competitive and non-competitive antagonism, drug efficacy and the derivation of a pA2, the mechanisms of drug action of the neuromuscular junction, the bioassay of unknown compounds and the elucidation of mediators released during anaphylaxis. Laboratory. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail.

PHARM 9620 Special Laboratory Procedures (1-3 credits) Staff
(Previously offered as 571.1-3)

Advanced techniques and instrumentation in pharmacological research will be covered. These include methods used in current research by the staff in the fields of cardiovascular, biochemical, autonomic and reproductive pharmacology as well as neuropharmacology and psychopharmacology. Laboratory. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail.

PHARM 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) Dr. Stier
(Previously offered as 590.1)

The student conducts a thorough library search and writes a scholarly report on an advanced topic in pharmacology under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Pass/Fail. Independent study. Required for M.S. degree, Plan A.

PHARM 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) Dr. Stier
(Previously offered as 598.1-5)

Original research in the laboratory of a faculty sponsor applied towards fulfillment of Plan B M.S. program requirements. Thesis research. Pass/Fail. May be taken multiple times for 1-5 credits per term, but only five credits may be counted towards program requirements.

PHARM 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) Dr. Stier
(Previously offered as 595.1)

The candidate must write a scholarly thesis describing his/her original laboratory research. The thesis must be approved by a faculty committee and defended by the student. Independent study. Pass/Fail. Required for M.S. degree, Plan B.

PHARM 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research Dr. Nasjletti
(Previously offered as 599.1-15)

Research is conducted in a selected field under the guidance of the staff member acting as the student’s advisor. The emphasis will be on originality, creativity, and contribution to the field. Thesis research. Pass/Fail. May be taken multiple times for an overall total of 15 credits.