New York Medical College

Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences

Program Course Descriptions

 

PHYS 1010, 1020 Mammalian Physiology
PHYS 1010 (4 credits) (Fall)
PHYS 1020 (4 credits) (Spring)(8 credits) Drs. Passo and Thompson
(Previously offered as 621A.4 and 621B.4)

This course provides the student with an introduction to each of the major physiological organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, neural and gastrointestinal) as well as basic concepts of cellular physiology. The course covers two semesters. PHYS–1010 or permission of the course director is a prerequisite for PHYS–1020. Lectures: 4hrs/wk. Letter-graded.

PHYS 1410 Mammalian Physiology
(9 credits) Dr. Levine & Staff
(Previously offered as 641.9)

Instruction is directed toward an understanding of the means by which the various organ systems of the human body operate and how these functions are integrated. Laboratory and group conferences are designed to illustrate and expand the lecture material. Lecture and Laboratory. Letter-graded. Open to Ph.D. students only.

PHYS 2010 Cardiovascular Physiology
(2 credits) Dr. Messina
(Previously offered as 666.2)

This course covers selected topics in cardiovascular physiology at a greater depth than in PHYS–1010. The historical and experimental development of ideas and the identification of current areas of controversy will be stressed. In addition to lectures by the instructors, student presentations and group discussions of selected original research reports will be included. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2020 The Heart
(2 credits) Drs. Belloni and Hintze
(Previously offered as 681.2)

This course provides an in-depth look at cardiac performance, and the cellular, ultrastructural and molecular bases of normal cardiac function and myocardial blood flow. The format will include both lectures and group discussions. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2030 Pathophysiological Mechanisms of the Heart
(2 credits) Drs. Hintze and Belloni
(Previously offered as 665.2)

Discussion of current knowledge of basic defects in physiological control mechanisms that result in cardiac disease states. Regular presentations by students, class discussions and guest lectures will be integral parts of the course. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2110 The Peripheral Circulation
(2 credits) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 683.2)

Various regional circulations will be examined in detail. The vascular beds to be studied include those of the heart, brain, skeletal muscle, gastrointestinal tract, skin, and kidney. Physiology and pathophysiology will be examined. The format will include lectures, student presentations of assigned readings and group discussions. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2120 Vascular Physiology
(2 credits) Drs. Kaley and Wolin
(Previously offered as 687.2)

The course concentrates on neuronal, humoral and local mechanisms of regulation of organ blood flow. It also focuses on physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of vascular smooth muscle contractility. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2130 Vascular Smooth Muscle and Control of the Microcirculation
(2 credits) Dr. Messina
(Previously offered as 682.2)

This course explores the diversity of vascular smooth muscle excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms. Additional topics include the influence of the endothelium on vascular tone and reactivity on local blood flow regulation. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2310 Cellular Physiology
(2 credits) Dr. Wolin
(Previously offered as 663.2)

Discussion of cellular functions including regulatory mechanisms involving receptors and second messengers, coordination of cellular metabolism to meet physiological challenges, functional properties of membranes and the structure-function relationship of such specialized cells as muscle, vascular and phagocytic cells. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2320 Biology of Nitric Oxide
(2 credits) Drs. Hintze and Thompson
(previously offered as 654.2)

This course has four specific aims: (1) provide an overview of the role of nitric oxide in mammalian biology; (2) explore in some detail specific areas of current research in the role of nitric oxide; (3) develop student comprehension of the current literature involving nitric oxide; and (4) improve the student’s ability to interpret the scientific literature and communicate in a scientific manner. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010.

PHYS 2410 Renal Physiology and Membrane Transport
(2 credits) Drs. Levine and Thompson
(Previously offered as 669.2)

The general control of the volume and composition of body fluids attributed to kidney functions will be addressed. Specific topics include: control of glomerular filtration; nephron function; transport of fluid, electrolytes and organic molecules; endocrine regulation of the kidney. Thermodynamic, kinetic, electrophysiological and metabolic aspects of membrane transport will be discussed. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2510 Reproduction
(2 credits) Drs. Levine and Thompson
(Previously offered as 674.2)

This course will include a detailed review of the endocrine and neuroendocrine interactions that regulate puberty, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, fertility, male and female physiological function and behavior. Effects of certain environmental and occupational hazards on fertility and reproductive behavior will be discussed. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2520 Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Physiology
(2 credits) Drs. Levine and Thompson
(Previously offered as 677.2)

The course will cover the basic interactions that occur between several endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. Feedback control of endocrine secretions, of hormone metabolism, and of metabolic and physiologic responses to various hormones will be discussed. The course will present an integrated approach to endocrinological functions, with an emphasis on how hormones act in concert. Some of the topics to be discussed are endocrine regulation of carbohydrate metabolism, growth, reproduction, lipid metabolism, salt and water intake. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2620 Pulmonary Physiology
(2 credits) Dr. Passo
(Previously offered as 676.2)

Aspects of the pulmonary system in normal and unique environments (high altitude and high pressure) will be discussed. The functioning of the pulmonary system in various obstructive and restrictive disease conditions will also be discussed. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2730 Cellular Neurophysiology
(2 credits) Dr. Ross
(Previously offered as 664.2)

An examination of the fundamental mechanisms of action potential propagation, synaptic transmission, and receptor potential generation. The course involves reading original research reports, but will emphasize an understanding of fundamental principles rather than an accumulation of research data from the experimental literature. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020 or BMS–1410.

PHYS 2910 Physiology of Exercise and Special Environments
(2 credits) Dr. Edwards
(Previously offered as 667.2)

This course will examine the integrated physiological response to exercise and the adaptation to special environments. Specific topics to be covered include the cardiovascular, respiratory and biochemical responses to exercise, marathon running and athletic training, as well the physiological adaptations to high altitude, undersea pressures and zero gravity environments. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020.

PHYS 2920 Use of Radioisotopes in Biology & Medicine
(2 credits) Dr. Hintze
(Previously offered as 652.2)

The first half of the course describes the physics, biological effects, safe handling and hazards of radioactive isotopes. The second half consists of lectures by faculty from several departments describing the use of radioactive isotopes in research. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Students may not receive credit for both PHYS–2920 and PATH–2920. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020 or permission of instructor.

PHYS 7010 Directed Readings in Physiology
(1-2 credits) Staff
(Previously offered as 660.x.1-2)

Students undertake a course of independent study under the guidance of one or more faculty advisors. Readings from textbooks, handbooks, monographs and the scientific periodical literature are assigned in a specific area of physiology that is relevant to the student’s interests. The student’s progress is monitored and evaluated through a series of oral or written examinations, oral presentations by the students to the faculty advisors(s), and one or more written essays or term papers based upon the assigned reading. A letter grade is assigned based upon the student’s performance in these exercises. This course may be taken more than once with concentration upon different topics in physiology. Available topics include cardiovascular, cardiac, vascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, muscle, renal, cellular, endocrine, or comparative physiology; neurophysiology; physiology special senses or special environments; fluid and electrolyte physiology; or customized topics. Independent study. Conferences: 1-2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020 or the equivalent, and permission of the instructor.

PHYS 8010 Journal Club
(1 credit) Dr. Passo
(Previously offered as 691.1)

Students attend and participate in presentation of reports on articles in current journals. Each student makes at least two presentations. Seminar: 1 hr/wk. Pass/Fail. May be taken multiple times.

PHYS 8020 Seminar/Research Rounds
(1 credit) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 690.1)

Ongoing research projects are presented by graduate students, faculty and visiting researchers. Seminar: 1 hr/wk. Pass/Fail. Open to Ph.D. students only. May be taken multiple times.

PHYS 8300 Practical Laboratory
(1 credit) Drs. Passo & Messina (Spring)
(Previously offered as 661.1)

Students take part in the preparation, performance and explanation of laboratory experiments and demonstrations in 641. Internship. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail. Open to Ph.D. students only. May be taken multiple times.

PHYS 9110 Predoctoral Research Rotation
(3 credits) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 650.3)

Students rotate through various laboratories in the department acquiring the practical skills necessary to conduct research. Research: hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail. Open to Ph.D. students only. May be taken twice, but only 3 credits may be applied to degree requirements.

PHYS 9500 Techniques in Physiological Research
(1-3 credits) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 651.1-2)

Students will learn experimental techniques within a given field of Physiology by working in a laboratory under the tutelage of a faculty person in that field. Research. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail. Open to Ph.D. students only. May be taken multiple times.

PHYS 9750 Master’s Literature Review
(1 credit) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 697.1)

Candidates for Master's degrees fulfill this Plan A requirement by writing a scholarly review summarizing the concepts and research on a topic within the field of physiology. To be selected and prepared under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Independent study. Pass/Fail. Required for M.S. degree, Plan A.

PHYS 9800 Master's Thesis Research
(1-5 credits) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 698.1-5)

Candidates for Master's degree fulfill this Plan B requirement by proposing a research project to be carried out under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Thesis research. Hours to be arranged. Pass/Fail. May be taken multiple times, for 1-5 credits per term, but only 5 credits may be counted towards program requirements (Plan B only).

PHYS 9850 Master’s Thesis
(1 credit) Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 695.1)

The candidate writes a scholarly thesis describing his/her original laboratory research (see PHYS–9800). The thesis must be approved by a faculty committee and defended by the student. Independent study. Pass/Fail. Required for M.S. degree, Plan B.

PHYS 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research
Dr. Thompson
(Previously offered as 699.1-15)

Dissertation research conducted by students who have qualified as candidates for the Ph.D. degree. Pass/Fail. Thesis research. Hours to be arranged. Open to Ph.D. students only. May be taken multiple times for an overall total of 15 credits.

BMS 1410 Neural Science
(8 credits) Dr. Sharma & Staff (Spring)
(Previously offered as 922.8)

An interdisciplinary course which integrates material from the fields of neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and neuropharmacology. Basic information is related to lectures and patient demonstrations by clinicians from fields of neurosurgery, neurology, neuropathology, mental retardation, psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine. Lectures and laboratory. Letter- graded. Open to Ph.D. students only.

BMS 3010 Molecular Neurobiology
(2 credits) Drs. Ross, Leonard and Sabban
(Previously offered as 920.2)

Discussion of the structure and function of important molecules in the nervous system. The first part of the course concerns itself with molecules responsible for ion transport, such as the sodium channel and transmitter receptor channel, utilizing results from path-clamping and gene cloning. The second part covers intercellular communication, such as peptides, NGF and cellular recognition molecules. Lectures: 2 hrs/wk. Letter-graded. Prerequisite: PHYS–1010, 1020 or BMS–1410.