Adolescent Medicine 

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We adhere to the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Preventio (ACIP) and the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) regarding the immunization of adolescents. These include a scheduled visit between the ages of 11 and 12 years to review the immunization status of each adolescent and, if needed provide the following vaccines:

  • A tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccine dose if not given in the previous five years. (Note: The temporary Td shortage in the United States is now over, there is enough supply to return to routine immunization and to reinstate the administration of Td boosters. Physicians are encouraged to recall those patients for whom Td boosters were deferred. For more information, click here.

  • A second dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, if not previously given. The CDC declared that MMR vaccine supplies are sufficient to return to the routine schedule as recommended by the ACIP/AAP. However, additional vaccine is not available for ambitious recall or special initiative programs at this time. For more information, click here.

  • Two doses of chickenpox vaccine, given a month apart, if there is no reliable history of chickenpox. The temporary shortage of chickenpox vaccine in the United States is now over and return to routine vaccination has been recommended by ACIP and AAP. For more information, click here.

  • Three doses of hepatitis B vaccine given over a 3 to 6 months period, if not previously given. A new two-dose regimen has been approved by the FDA and recommended by the ACIP of the CDC for adolescents between the ages of 11 and 15 years. For more information, click here.

 The American College Health Association and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have also issued recommendations for the administration of the meningococcal vaccine to college students, particularly those living in college dormitories. Meningococcal disease is a serious concern for older adolescents and young adults.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has issued recommendations for the administration of other vaccines to adolescents who belong to special groups and for those traveling abroad. For more details about each of these vaccines, click on one of the links to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices on this page or visit the site of the Immunization Action Coalition, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to boost immunization rates and prevent disease.

We remind all new patients to bring a copy of their immunization record to the first visit.

Click on this marquee to obtain a booklet about everything you wanted to know about Vaccine Information Statements (VIS)


 
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Last modified: November 04, 2004