NYMC > News and Events > NYMC in the News
Quick Search
Total Search Results for "{{searchedParams.q}}" : {{searchedSubData.data.hits.total}}
{{item.content_type}}

Helping Ease Kids' Fears After Manchester Terror Attack

May 23, 2017

As reports of the carnage at Monday's Ariana Grande show in Manchester, England, continue to pour in, many teens with tickets to concerts during the coming summer music season may be reluctant to attend an event. But child and adolescent psychiatrists say it's important that parents let their teens follow through on their plans, even if the adults themselves are anxious about their letting kids go out. "It's never good for teenagers to learn the lesson that they need to avoid things that scare them," said Dr. Matthew Lorber, a child and adolescent psychiatrist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "You have to face your fears.

NYMC Faculty: Matthew Lorber, M.D., M.P.A., clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

HealthDay

Heritage Provider Network And Crain's New York Business, Custom Division, Announce Winners In The 2nd Annual Heritage Healthcare Innovation Awards For

May 22, 2017

Heritage Provider Network (HPN) one of the nations most experienced and effective physician led value based care organizations and Crain's Custom Studio, a division of Crain's New York Business, today announced the winners in the 2nd annual Heritage Healthcare Innovation Awards. The awards honored those innovators who have most improved the access to and quality of affordable healthcare in the communities they serve in the greater New York area.

Heritage Innovation in Healthcare Delivery Award: Nora V. Bergasa, MD, MACP, FAASLD, AGAF, Professor of Medicine, New York Medical College; Chief of Medicine, NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan: Recognizing an innovator in the development of new modes of diagnosis, treatment and care who actively improves access to services and improves the quality of healthcare overall. 

NYMC Faculty: Nora Bergasa, M.D., professor of medicine

NBC 12

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

May 20, 2017

The list of things that can be created with 3-D printers keeps getting longer: jewelry, art, guns, food, medical devices and, now, mouse ovaries. Scientists have used a 3-D printer to create a mouse ovary capable of producing healthy offspring. And researchers hope to create replacement human ovaries the same way someday.

To use the technology in humans in the future, doctors could remove follicles from a woman before she starts chemotherapy. They would put that tissue into a larger, 3-D-printed ovary scaffold, then transplant the device into the patient when she finishes treatment. "I find this paper very exciting," says Kutluk Oktay, who specializes in fertility restoration at New York Medical College and was not involved in the work. Oktay cautions that much more research is needed to see whether this approach would work in humans. However, he is optimistic. "I think it does open a new avenue in the area of reproductive biology and fertility preservation," Oktay says.

NYMC Faculty: Kutluk Oktay, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, and cell biology and anatomy

NRP

New York Medical College, WMC sign affiliation agreement

May 19, 2017

New York Medical College (NYMC) and Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMC) officials on May 17 signed a 12-year academic affiliation agreement that both organizations believe will strengthen their academic medicine programs, clinical care and research practices.

“This (agreement) renews our commitment to a continued partnership with WMCHealth and its affiliated hospitals as our primary academic sites,” said New York Medical College Chancellor and CEO Dr. Edward C. Halperin.

NYMC Leadership: 

Edward C. Halperin, M.D., M.A., chancellor and chief executive officer
Dr. Mark Hasten, chairman of the Board of Trustees
Alan Kadish, M.D., president

 

Westchester Business Journal

NY Medical College, Westchester Medical Center Announce Long-Term Agreement

May 18, 2017

New York Medical College and the Westchester Medical Center Health Network announced Wednesday a 12-year agreement that they hope will strengthen medical research and clinical care.

Under the agreement, hospitals on Westchester Medical Center's  Valhalla campus will be the primary teaching sites for the clinical education of students of New York Medical College and Touro College affiliated programs.

NYMC Leadership: Edward C. Halperin, M.D., M.A., chancellor and chief executive officer

 

 

The Daily Voice

Kennedy Alumnus Saves Life of Jimmy Kimmel’s Son

May 18, 2017

Evan Zahn offers a look at modern cardiology amid Kimmel case.

Jimmy Kimmel choked back tears on the May 1 episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live” when he recounted what happened to his son, Billy, who was born with a near-fatal heart disease less than two weeks earlier. The late night host sounded off on the state of American health care, praised the Affordable Care Act and thanked the doctors who saved his son’s life – including Bellmore JFK alumnus Evan Zahn.

NYMC Alumni: Evan Zahn, M.D. ’86

LI Herald

Living with Cancer: As Science Gets Better at Controlling It, Let’s Kill t

May 18, 2017

Framing cancer as a kind of war within our bodies can also seriously harm a persons emotional psyche. Who wants to go to war with themselves? radiation oncologist Edward Halperin, of New York Medical College, writesin the journal Practical Radiation Oncology. How is it ever helpful to think of oneself as a victim who was randomly attacked and now youre trying to kill your assailant in order to survive? For some, the war imagery, the determination to hit hard and hit fast, can be empowering, he and others acknowledge. Some cancer patients may perceive themselves as a soldier going to war, Halperin said. But surely not all do.

NYMC Leadership: Edward C. Halperin, M.D., M.A., chancellor and chief executive officer

 

Newscaf

Learning to Live with Cancer

May 18, 2017

Framing cancer as a kind of war within our bodies can also seriously harm a person’s emotional psyche. “Who wants to go to war with themselves?” radiation oncologist Edward Halperin, of New York Medical College, writes in the journal Practical Radiation Oncology. “How is it ever helpful to think of oneself as a victim who was randomly attacked and now you’re trying to kill your assailant in order to survive?

NYMC Leadership: Edward C. Halperin, M.D., M.A., chancellor and chief executive officer

 

National Post

Trainees Graduate from LEND Program

May 16, 2017

Twenty six trainees graduated from Westchester Institute for Human Development’s LEND program this past week, adding to the growing number of individuals educated with the leadership skills and knowledge necessary to work with and on behalf of children with disabilities and  their families.

NYMC Mentions:
Susan W. Fox, Ph.D., associate professor of health policy and management and director of the Center on Disability and Health
MegAnn McGinnis, M.P.H. student in behavioral sciences and health promotion, Surbhi Arora, M.P.H. student in behavioral sciences and health promotion, Amanda Apa, M.S. in speech-language pathology Class of 2017, and Jennifer Sparano, M.S. in speech-language pathology Class of 2017

 

HVNN.com

Westchester Institute for Human Development Graduates New Class from LEND program

May 16, 2017

Twenty six trainees graduated from Westchester Institute for Human Development’s LEND program this past week, adding to the growing number of individuals educated with the leadership skills and knowledge necessary to work with and on behalf of children with disabilities and their families.

NYMC Mentions: 

Susan W. Fox, Ph.D., associate professor of health policy and management and director of the Center on Disability and Health
MegAnn McGinnis, M.P.H. student in behavioral sciences and health promotion, Surbhi Arora, M.P.H. student in behavioral sciences and health promotion, Amanda Apa, M.S. in speech-language pathology Class of 2017, and Jennifer Sparano, M.S. in speech-language pathology Class of 2017

 

Patch.com

Can Fidget Spinners Help You Focus?

May 15, 2017

They’ve been called the ”must-have office toy” by Forbes. Some teachers and parents love them; others loathe them. Fidget spinners are toy-like devices that sit on a ball bearing and spin easily on your hand or a hard surface. By keeping your hands busy, they are supposed to ease stress, manage fidgeting and help people with ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder) focus. Prices range from as little as a dollar to several hundred for the more elaborate designs. Matthew Lorber, MD, a child psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, says many parents of children with ADHD are asking his opinion about the popular toy and how it works. He shared the most common questions he hears with WebMD.

NYMC Faculty: Matthew Lorber, M.D., M.P.A., clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

WebMD

Are All Those 'Fidget Spinners' Really Helping Kids?

May 15, 2017

Fidget spinners may be the latest must-have kids' toy, but claims that the gizmos help students pay attention aren't backed by science, experts say. Some retailers market the devices as a way to help kids with anxiety, autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) keep themselves calm and focused in the classroom. The claims likely are based on small-scale studies that show kids with ADHD pay better attention if they are allowed to fidget, said Dr. Matthew Lorber, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "They actually perform better because it indirectly forces the brain to work harder to focus on the task at hand," Lorber said.

NYMC Faculty: Matthew Lorber, M.D., M.P.A., clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

Health Day

Two Incumbents Among Four Vying for Mt. Pleasant Town Board

May 15, 2017

The race for the Mount Pleasant Town Board is heating up as three Republicans are seeking the party’s nomination for two council seats while a Democrat recently announced he was entering the fray. In recent years, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and New York Medical College has expanded its facilities and North 60 would be “a project that’s not only good for Mount Pleasant, it’s good for the area,” Smalley said. “I think we’re on the precipice of something really good here in Mount Pleasant. We’re moving forward,” she said. 

The Examiner

The fest will present Changemaker Awards to Renee Zellweger and Christy Turlington Burns

May 13, 2017

Bending the Arc, Kief Davidson and Pedro Kos’s documentary about doctors working in a rural Haitian village, will serve as the opening film at the 3rd annual Greenwich International Film Festival, which runs from June 1-4 in Greenwich, Conn.  The film will screen on June 2, followed by a Town Hall Panel Q&A moderated by Barbara Pierce Bush with Ophelia Dahl (Partners in Health), writer/producer Cori Stern, Joia Mukherjee (Partners in Health) and Rifat Latifi  M.D. from Westchester Medical Center, discussing the state of global healthcare.

NYMC Faculty: Rifat Latifi, M.D., professor of surgery 

The Movie Reactor

Postpartum PTSD: Beyond Postpartum Depression in Maternal Mental Health

May 12, 2017

Most people consider maternal mental health to be synonymous with postpartum depression. However, there are many other similar disorders, collectively described as perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs). One such disorder is postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder. While PTSD as a whole used to be characterized as an anxiety disorder in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), it is now in a new chapter in DSM-V titled “Trauma- and Stress-Related Disorders.” 

NYMC Faculty: Ami S. Baxi M.D., instructor of psychiatry & behavioral sciences

Psychiatry Advisor

Local News

May 12, 2017

NYMC Faculty: 

Kira A. Geraci-Ciardullo, M.D., M.P.H., adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics
Andrew W. Grose, M.D., assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery
Howard J. Luks, M.D., assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery
Daniel Zelazny, M.D.,  assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery
Jeremy Mangion, M.D., instructor of orthopaedic surgery
John Galeno, M.D., assistant professor of clinical orthopaedic surgery
David E. Asprinio, M.D., professor of clinical orthopaedic surgery and chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Richard Magill, M.D., assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery
Damon DelBello, M.D., assistant professor of clinical orthopaedic surgery

MD News

Local News

May 12, 2017

The Heart and Vascular Institute, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), recently celebrated the opening of its first Long Island practice, which brings cardiac care to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients living in the area.

NYMC Faculty: Julio A. Panza, M.D., professor of medicine

Westchester Medical Center
Phelps Memorial Hospital Center
Calvary Hospital

 

MD News

16-Year-Old Fighting Early Menopause

May 12, 2017

While most kids at 16 are learning how to drive and worried about what to wear to prom, Stephanie Gallagher of Pompton Plains NJ is going through menopause and worried about her fertility.

NYMC Faculty: Kutluk Oktay, M.D., professor of obstetrics and gynecology, cell biology and anatomy, medicine  and pathology

Chasing News

Homeopathy Explained

May 11, 2017

Homeopathy has a very rich history here in the U.S. The oldest medical organization in the U.S. is the American Institute of Homeopathy, which predates the formation of the AMA by several years and is still active today. At its peak in the late 1800s, there were 22 homeopathic medical schools and over 100 homeopathic hospitals. The Albany Homeopathic Hospital once stood on North Pearl Street. It later moved to the current location of Albany Memorial Hospital, which was originally a homeopathic hospital, before it eventually became an allopathic hospital. My grandfather graduated as an M.D. from New York Homeopathic Medical College in 1928. By the mid-1930s, the school dropped its homeopathic designation and became New York Medical College, which now resides in Valhalla, N.Y.

TimesUnion