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Mid-Hudson Region to Receive $84.8 Million in State Development Funds

December 18, 2017

About $85 million in state grants and tax credits has been awarded to 113 development projects in the mid-Hudson Valley region. In Westchester, 23 projects will receive more than $10 million total this year. Major private and public capital projects to receive funding in the county this year include the following: BioInc@NYMC, New York Medical College’s biotech focused incubator, will receive $1.25 million through the state’s Innovation Hot Spot Support Program, which provides operating grants for designated “Innovation Hot Spots” that promote entrepreneurial activities.

Westfair Communications

Christmas Day Seizures

December 18, 2017

Generic NYMC in the News LogoIn the early ’90s, Ronald Jacobson, M.D. noticed an interesting trend after working on Christmas day for several years in a row. “I was always getting calls about a child having a seizure after having gotten a videogame,” recalls Dr. Jacobson, Chief of Pediatric Neurology at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network. He quickly coined a term for the unique trend, “Christmas Day Seizures.”

NYMC Faculty: Ronald I. Jacobson, M.D., clinical associate professor of pediatrics and neurology

Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley

What Should I Know About Toddler Safety During the Holidays?

December 18, 2017

Generic NYMC in the News LogoMost parents are well versed in the dangers of toy-choking hazards facing toddlers, but according to Darshan Patel, MD, Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, parents of young children should be mindful of a few lesser-known holiday hazards.

NYMC Faculty: Darshan D. Patel. M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics, family and community medicine and emergency medicine

Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley

Student Research Team Monitoring Success of Social Service Programs in Camden

December 16, 2017

Generic NYMC in the News LogoWith the assistance of Chia-Ching Chen, a professor of epidemiology and community health at New York Medical College and an expert on program planning and evaluation, they are currently translating some qualitative data gleaned from the ongoing, day-to-day social workers’ interactions with the residents into workable, consistent, quantitative data. 

NYMC Faculty: Chia-Ching Chen, M.A., M.S., Ed.D., C.H.E.S., professor of epidemiology and community health

SNJ Today

Specialist Honored

December 15, 2017

Robert G. Josephberg, M.D., headshotDr. Robert Josephberg, chief of retina and vitreous at Westchester Medical Center was recently inducted into the Retina Hall of Fame for his expertise and contributions to the field.  

The retina is the portion of the eye on which light is focused. The light is then transformed into signals that the brain can interpret. The retina has been compared with film in a still or movie camera or the photosensitive electronic plate in a television camera. Vitreous fills the inside of the eye.

The Retina Hall of Fame honors those have devoted their professional lives to innovation, research and clinical care. 

NYMC Faculty: Robert G. Josephberg, M.D., clinical associate professor of ophthalmology

Westfair Communications

NY Medical College Receives Federal Funds For Research

December 13, 2017

"Advances in scientific research hold tremendous potential to help the millions of people struggling with heart and metabolic problems," Lowey said. "This funding will support New York Medical College's cutting-edge research and innovation that may save lives. As Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee, I will continue working to bring these essential resources to the Lower Hudson Valley."

"I am truly excited to embark on these studies," said Dr. Michal Laniado Schwartzman, professor and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at New York Medical College School of Medicine. "This new discovery opens a new front in this area of research as it identifies a novel and unique therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases including heart failure, stroke and diabetes."

NYMC Faculty: Michal Laniado Schwartzman, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacology

White Plains Patch

Lowey Announces $586k in Federal Funds for Cardiovascular Disease Research at NYMC

December 13, 2017

“Advances in scientific research hold tremendous potential to help the millions of people struggling with heart and metabolic problems,” said Congresswoman Lowey. “This funding will support New York Medical College’s cutting-edge research and innovation that may save lives. As Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee, I will continue working to bring these essential resources to the Lower Hudson Valley.”“I am truly excited to embark on these studies,” said Dr. Michal Laniado Schwartzman, Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology at New York Medical College School of Medicine. “This new discovery opens a new front in this area of research as it identifies a novel and unique therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases including heart failure, stroke and diabetes.”

NYMC Faculty: Michal Laniado Schwartzman, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacology

Congresswoman Nita Lowey

Tech at Bedtime May Mean Heavier Kids

December 12, 2017

a young child looking into a technology screenKids and their smartphones aren't easily parted, but if you want your children to get a good night's sleep and to stay at a healthy weight, limiting bedtime screen time appears key, new research suggests.Parent surveys revealed that using a smartphone or watching TV at bedtime was tied to a greater body mass index (BMI). BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.And using any technology at bedtime -- cellphones, TVs, laptops, iPads and video games -- was linked to getting about an hour less sleep, poorer sleep and, not surprisingly, morning fatigue.

NYMC Faculty: Peter L. Richel, M.D., clinical assistant professor of pediatrics

Health

Good Sam Peripheral Vascular Bypass Program Again Receives Top Rating From Healthgrades: People In The News

December 12, 2017

Generic NYMC in the News LogoFareri Associates is a diversified real estate investment and development company well known for its more than 40 years creating distinctive residential homes as well as high-quality office and retail space. Currently, the company is developing several mixed-use projects in Greenwich including the Greenwich Office Park. Fareri Associates is also the developer of the Westchester BioScience & Technology Center, a nearly 3 million-square-foot, mixed-use complex to be built on 80 acres adjacent to New York Medical College and the Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla.

The Journal News

The Perfect Storm: 4 Reasons Winter Can Be Bad For Your Heart

December 11, 2017

running through the snow The winter season, with its cold inclement weather, can put a strain on your heart, especially if you’re one of the over 15 million Americans with coronary artery disease. Understanding why cold weather is so hard on your heart can help you avoid the dangers and stay healthy.

1. Plummeting Temperatures
2. Cold Weather and Physical Activity 
3. Shorter Days, More Darkness
4. Holidays and Your Heart

NYMC Faculty: William H. Frishman, M.D., the Barbara and William Rosenthal Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and professor of pharmacology

The Oz Blog

Gum Disease Bacteria Linked To Esophageal Cancer

December 10, 2017

a closeup of someone's mouth white flossingGum disease has already been linked in numerous studies to a heightened risk of the number one killer, heart disease. However, Dr. Anthony Starpoli, associate director of esophageal endotherapy at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, an expert in esophageal cancer, reviewed the new findings and stressed that researchers have yet to prove a causal link to esophageal tumors.

NYMC Faculty: Anthony A. Starpoli, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of medicine

Inquisitr

Doctors: Wave of Viruses, Not Only Flu, Are Sweeping Long Island

December 09, 2017

Deborah M. Friedman, M.D. headshot

“Epidemic is a scary word,” Leonardi said. The word, however, doesn’t frighten Dr. Deborah Friedman, a specialist in pediatric intensive care and a professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College in Westchester County. Friedman also is a spokeswoman for a consortium of hospital labs that monitor RSV statewide. She said the viral infection has reached epidemic levels elsewhere in New York, and because viruses are unpredictable, it is anyone’s guess where the infectious agent will next cause outbreaks.

“The epidemic at the current time is in New York City. Of course, these things change quickly. So we can assume that the epidemic will be spreading,” said Friedman, who is part of RSVAlert. The service relies on information from 23 laboratories throughout the state known as the Core Based Statistical Group. No Long Island hospitals are in the consortium.

NYMC Faculty: Deborah M. Friedman, M.D., professor of pediatrics

Newsday

Work Directing Clinical Lab

December 08, 2017

John H. Wolk, M.D., headshotCareMount Medical in Chappaqua has announced the appointment of Dr. John Wolk as its new clinical laboratory director. Wolk will be responsible for managing the overall quality of diagnostic laboratory tests across CareMount Medical’s 19 lab sites in the Hudson Valley. He had been chief of microbiological services at the Westchester County Department of Laboratories and Research in Valhalla.

NYMC faculty: John H. Wolk, M.D., assistant professor of pathology

Westfair Online

Touro Dental College Opens Clinic in New York

December 05, 2017

a picture of a dental clinicThe Touro College of Dental Medicine at New York Medical College in Hawthorne has opened Touro Dental Health, a 32,000-square-foot facility where students will be trained and patients from the lower Hudson Valley, Westchester County, and the metropolitan New York City area will receive comprehensive and affordable care beginning in January. “We are thrilled to be opening the state-of-the-art facility, which will serve as the advanced educational training platform for our students as they immerse themselves in clinical dentistry,” said Alan Kadish, MD, president of the Touro College and University System. “The opening of Touro Dental Health is an important milestone for both the school and the community.”

NYMC Mentions: Alan Kadish, M.D., president, Ronnie Myers, D.D.S., dean of TouroCDM, and Edward Farkas, D.D.S., vice dean for administrative affairs, TouroCDM

Dentistry Today

Touro College Dental Clinic Begins Accepting Appointments

December 04, 2017

Touro College of Dental Medicine’s dental clinic in Hawthorne is now accepting patient appointments. The 32,000-square-foot oral health facility at 19 Skyline Drive will begin treating patients in January 2018. “Opening an oral health care facility of this magnitude and quality will ensure access to care for underserved populations and others in the community who seek quality, low-cost dental care,” said Ronnie Myers, dean of Touro’s College of Dental Medicine.

NYMC Mentions: Alan Kadish, M.D., president, and Ronnie Myers, D.D.S., dean of TouroCDM

Westfair Online

CIRS Publishes Research on Healthcare in Region

December 04, 2017

Albert B. Lowenfels, M.D. headshotIn recent years, the countries of the Gulf have witnessed massive transformations in infrastructure, rapid economic growth, and significant population changes. But how has this impacted the healthcare provided in these nations has been discussed in a new publication by Georgetown University in Qatar’s premier research institute, the Center for International and Regional Studies (CIRS). Critical Issues in Healthcare Policy and Politics in the Gulf Cooperation Council States is the first book to examine the challenges facing the healthcare sector in the Gulf region. The book was edited by NYMC Faculty Ravinder Mamtani, M.D., adjunct professor of family and community medicine and adjunct associate professor of medicine, and Albert B. Lowenfels, M.D., (pictured) professor emeritus of surgery.

The Peninsula Qatar's Daily Newspaper

New Blood Pressure Guidelines: The Numbers That Really Matter

December 04, 2017

William H. Frishman, M.D.'s headshotUnder the new guidelines, nearly half of all Americans will have high blood pressure. Under the old guidelines, only 1 in 3 American adults, or 33 percent of the population, were considered to have high blood pressure, which was defined as a blood pressure reading of 140/90 mmHg (millimeters of mercury). The new guidelines define high blood pressure as 130/80 mmHg. These new guidelines, which appeared in an article published in November 2017 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, were developed with nine other health professional organizations to hopefully more accurately identify those at risk for serious health issues. “One good thing about the new guidelines is that they remind people that high blood pressure is a major risk factor for premature heart disease, stroke, heart attacks, heart failure, and even dementia,” says William Frishman, MD, chair of medicine at New York Medical College and director of medicine at Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, New York. “By following the new guidelines, we’ll see fewer negative health outcomes from high blood pressure.”

NYMC Faculty: William H. Frishman, M.D., the Barbara and William Rosenthal Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and professor of pharmacology

 

Everyday Health

Q&A: Expert Explores the Link Between Natural Disasters, Stress and Heart Disease

December 03, 2017
William H. Frishman, M.D.'s headshotBetween global hurricanes and the California wildfires, the number of natural disasters has been high in 2017. Recent research suggests a correlation between natural disasters and increased rates of MI. Cardiology Today recently discussed the link between natural disasters and cardiac health with William H. Frishman, MD, MPH, director of medicine at Westchester Medical Center and the Rosenthal Professor and chairman of the department of medicine at New York Medical College.
 
NYMC Faculty: William H. Frishman, M.D., the Barbara and William Rosenthal Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and professor of pharmacology

 

Healio

Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley

December 01, 2017

Expanded Cardiology Offerings in Dutchess County (page 3)
Syed H.M. Naqvi, M.D., clinical assistant professor of medicine

The Westchester Warriors: Fighting for Pediatric Cancer Patients (page 4)
Pictured: Mitchell Cairo, M.D., center, professor of pediatrics, medicine, pathology, microbiology and immunology and cell biology and anatomy, associate chairman of the Department of Pediatrics

She Hasn’t Got Time for the Pain (page 8)
Yigal Samocha, M.D., clinical assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery

Saved by Teamwork (page 10)
Justin G. Santarelli. M.D.. assistant professor of neurosurgery

Brotherly Love (page 12)
Robyn G. Matloff, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of pediatrics
Gregory R. Veillette, M.D., assistant professor of surgery
Thomas Diflo, M.D., professor of surgery

Nourishing Newborns (page 16)
Boriana Parvez, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics
Shetal I. Shah, M.D., professor of pediatrics
Heather L. Brumberg, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of pediatrics

A Grueling Workout Unmasked This Fitness Trainer’s Hidden Cardiac Condition (page 18)
Sei Iwai, M.D., professor of medicine

Just the Facts: Hand Hygiene (page 20)
Sheila M. Nolan, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics

Just the Facts: Are you a Compulsive Hoarder (page 21)
Alexander C. Lerman, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley

Gum Disease Tied to Yet Another Deadly Illness

December 01, 2017

a closeup of someone's mouth white flossingAdd one more reason to why you should brush and floss regularly: Gum disease bacteria are now tied to higher odds of esophageal cancer. The study tracked the oral health of 122,000 Americans for 10 years. It found that the presence of two types of bacteria linked with gum disease may hike the risk of the cancer. “What is not clear is whether the presence of these bacteria or the resultant periodontal disease is primarily responsible for the development of cancer,” said Dr. Anthony Starpoli, associate director of esophageal endotherapy at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Still, Starpoli believes specialists should “consider a proper evaluation of the oral cavity as well as the remainder of the digestive tract in the hope of early diagnosis of esophageal cancer.”

NYMC Faculty: Anthony A Starpoli, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of medicine

The Health Cast