NYMC > News and Events > NYMC in the News
Quick Search
Total Search Results for "{{searchedParams.q}}" : {{searchedSubData.data.hits.total}}
{{item.content_type}}

Diet as Good as PPI’s for Gerd

September 17, 2017
  A primarily plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet with alkaline water showed significantly greater improvement for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms than treatment with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), according to a retrospective study published September 7 in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
Cancerology

Fox Named to State Group

September 15, 2017
Faculty in the News   Susan Fox has been named to the stakeholders group formed by the New York State Department of Health for its Disability and Health Program. Fox is the president and CEO of the Westchester Institute for Human Development.

NYMC Faculty:
Susan W. Fox, Ph.D., associate professor of health policy and management and director of the Center on Disability and Health
Westfair

YIWP Expands Learning, Leadership With First-Ever Fellowship Program

September 14, 2017
  Young Israel of White Plains is expanding its learning, leadership and outreach opportunities with the creation of the YIWP Jewish Scholarship/Fellowship Program. The first-ever fellowship program at the shul aims to develop Jewish leaders by bringing them together for intellectual and social engagement around central issues of contemporary Jewish life. The fellowship program is open to both men and women, and six fellows will be named to participate. The program will run for six months between Sukkot and Pesach and will commence on October 25.

NYMC Faculty:
Ira Bedzow, M.A., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and director of Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Program
The Jewish Link

Expert Q&A: Schizophrenia and Weight Gain

September 14, 2017
  Patients with schizophrenia are at high risk for weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. There are many factors that contribute to this, including genetic predisposition to metabolic abnormalities, environmental factors such as poor diet, lack of exercise, cigarette smoking, and iatrogenic considerations such as exposure to medications that can lead to further disruption of metabolic health.

NYMC Faculty: Leslie Citrome, M.D., M.P.H., clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences
Psychiatric Times

Healthy Teeth, Happy Kids: 6 Back to School Teeth Tips

September 13, 2017
 

With kids around the country returning to school, now is the perfect time to kick off the school year with some good dental habits for your children. Here are some tips to make sure your kids’ teeth are happy and healthy.

Faculty News: Melissa Levine, D.D.S., associate professor of dental medicine and director of pediatric dentistry
New York Jewish life

Mediterranean Diet With Alkaline Water Might Ease Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

September 13, 2017
 

Combining a Mediterranean diet with alkaline water appears to be as effective as protein pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for treating laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), according to a retrospective study.

“I think these findings strongly suggest that if LPR is suspected as the cause of a patient’s symptoms, then a plant-based diet, alkaline water, and standard reflux precautions should at least be strongly encouraged prior to taking a PPI (or any drug for reflux),” Dr. Craig H. Zalvan from New York Medical College, in Valhalla, told Reuters Health by email.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
M.D. Alert

Fox Named to NYSDHP Stakeholders Group

September 12, 2017
Faculty in the News   The Westchester Institute for Human Development (WIHD), one of 67 university-affiliated centers in the nation dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities through education, service, and research, has announced the appointment of Dr. Susan Fox, President and CEO of WIHD to the New York State Department of Health, Disability and Health Program Stakeholders Group (NYSDHP).

NYMC Faculty: Susan W. Fox, Ph.D., associate professor of health policy and management and director of the Center on Disability and Health
HVNN

Acid Reflux? Try Going Vegetarian

September 12, 2017
 

A mostly vegetarian diet may provide relief similar to widely used medications for people with acid reflux, a new study suggests. The study looked at close to 200 patients at one medical center who had been diagnosed with laryngopharyngeal reflux..

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology

Chicago Tribune

Study: Mediterranean Diet Stems Acid-Reflux, Stops Need for Drugs

September 11, 2017
 

Consumption of a plant-based diet and filtered water can effectively treat a common medical condition characterized by the backflow of stomach acids into the upper airway and throat, eliminating the need for medications, physicians at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have found.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology

Newsday

Worldwide Community First Responder Honoring Five At Annual Gala

September 11, 2017
  The gala is being held on Saturday, Sept. 30 at The Time Nyack at 400 High Ave. from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Other honorees are Sciencia Torchon, a nurse, Dr. Mario Nelson and WomenHeart. Mike Snow, senior director for global safety at Bunge Limited will be the keynote speaker while News 12 meteorologist Brysen Van Eck will be the MC.

NYMC Faculty: Mario Nelson, M.D., associate professor of rehabilitation medicine
Daily Voice

7 Parenting Truths Pediatricians Tell Their Friends

September 09, 2017
  It's Not Your Checkup

"It's always awkward when I'm trying to engage a child during a visit and the mom or dad keeps answering my questions. From the time your little one can hold a conversation, I want to talk to him about what his favorite foods are or what he likes to do. It makes the appointment more fun, but more important, it allows me to build a relationship with your child. Right now you're in the exam room with him, but when he's starting middle school, I'm going to ask for five to 10 minutes alone with him to find out what's going on in his life that he might not want to bring up in front of you. Even if there's not much now, there will be by 14 or 15, so it's important he feels comfortable sharing." -Vicki Iannotti, M.D., Associate Chief Of General Pediatrics At Maria Fareri Children's Hospital Of The Westchester Medical Center Health Network In Valhalla, NY

NYMC Faculty: Vicki A. Iannotti, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics
MSN

Mediterranean Diet Just As Good As Drugs In Controlling Acid Reflux Symptoms

September 09, 2017
 

Researchers compared the effects of a Mediterranean diet and traditional medication on people who have been diagnosed with laryngopharyngeal reflux. The Mediterranean diet showed promising results in reducing symptoms of the condition.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology

Tech Times

Congress Imperils Kids' Futures by Delaying Health Plan Renewal: Doctors

September 08, 2017
 

Twenty years ago, Congress made a commitment to its children when it created the Children’s Health Insurance Program, recognizing working parents who earned too much to qualify for Medicaid still couldn’t afford health insurance for their kids. As medical students in Boston and New York City, we remember vividly the impact on care when children didn’t have insurance. Pediatric emergency rooms were filled with children who needed routine school physicals because they didn’t have regular doctors. Parents waited for hours for routine complaints. Our children’s hospitals were often filled with kids with asthma simply because they couldn’t get their medication from lack of health insurance. It was the worst way to provide health care.

NYMC Faculty: Shetal I. Shah, M.D., professor of pediatrics and Heather L. Brumberg, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of pediatrics

The Journal News

Specializing in One Sport? How to Keep Your Young Athlete Healthy

September 08, 2017
  Another hazard zone of single-sport specialization is psychological burnout. This is one thing Dr. Howard Luks, an orthopedic surgeon at Westchester Medical Center in New York, sees on a regular basis. “Parents need to be aware that when their kids don’t get breaks from their sports, many of them turn off,” he says. “Yet sports are so important to development. We learn how to work in groups, how to move and how to take direction.”

NYMC Faculty: Howard J. Luks, M.D. '91, M.S. '90, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery
Fitness Health Yoga

New Study Links The Mediterranean Diet To Reduced Reflux Symptoms

September 08, 2017
 

Reflux is one of the most common health complaints among Americans, and the drugs used to relieve it are among the nation's best-selling meds. Americans spend nearly $13 billion a year on both prescription and over-the-counter versions of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), the most popular anti-reflux medications. The type of reflux in the study, called laryngopharyngeal reflux. or LPR, is concentrated in the upper part of the digestive tract and is triggered when pepsin, a digestive enzyme from the stomach, reaches the sensitive tissues there. That can damage tissues and cause symptoms like throat clearing, a feeling that something is lodged in the throat, hoarseness and trouble swallowing. “You’re not supposed to have acid up in the throat,” says Dr. Craig Zalvan, medical director of the institute for voice and swallowing disorders at Phelps Hospital of Northwell Health in New York and lead author of the study. “The tissues there have poor protection against acid and pepsin.”

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology

ABC News

Back-to-School Tips for Healthy Teeth

September 08, 2017
  Six tips to keep your children's teeth healthy as they head back to school. With kids gearing up to go back to school, now is the perfect time to kick off the school year with some good dental habits.
  1. Avoid anything sticky when packing your children’s lunch. While raisins and gummy "fruit snacks" might seem like a healthy option, these sugary foods will stay stuck to the teeth for unnecessarily long periods of time and can lead to cavities.
  2. Encourage the use of a straw when drinking fruit juice or a soda. This minimizes sugary or acidic liquid coming in contact with teeth.
  3. Limit snacks. When it comes to snacking, it’s not just about the kind of snack, but the frequency. One large snack is preferable to multiple small snacks throughout the day because it limits instances of acidic erosion.
  4. Invest in a mouth guard to help prevent oral injuries if your child is on a sports team. While getting a custom-fit mouth guard is ideal, a store bought mouth guard is better than nothing, especially for elementary and middle school kids whose teeth may still be changing.
  5. Brush twice a day—morning and night. It’s always recommended. Parents of children who are younger than 7 should help their kids brush—they have not yet developed the dexterity to adequately brush their teeth themselves.
  6. Schedule checkups. Always remember to see a dentist for checkups and cleanings every six months so problems can be dealt with when they're small—or, better yet, avoid dental problems all together!
NYMC Faculty: Melissa Levine, D.D.S., associate professor of dental medicine and director of pediatric dentistry
NYMetroParents

Acid Reflux May Respond Better To Diet Than Drugs

September 07, 2017
 

Reflux is one of the most common health complaints among Americans, and the drugs used to relieve it are among the nation's best-selling meds. Americans spend nearly $13 billion a year on both prescription and over-the-counter versions of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), the most popular anti-reflux medications. But it turns out that drugs aren't necessary for some forms of the digestive condition. In a new study published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, researchers found that for people with acid reflux that affects the throat, a Mediterranean diet—one rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes—was just as effective as PPIs in treating their symptoms.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
TIME

Treating Reflux With Diet

September 07, 2017
  A small study has found that a plant-based diet is just as effective as proton pump inhibitors in treating laryngopharyngeal reflux, or LPR. LPR is a disease in which stomach acid comes up into the throat to the level of the laryngopharynx. It is not the same as gastro-esophageal reflux, or GERD, which involves a backflow of stomach acid into the lower esophagus. The retrospective study, in JAMA Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, included 85 patients with an average age of 60 treated with the P.P.I.s Nexium and Dexilant, and 99 treated with alkaline water and the Mediterranean diet, a regimen low in meat and dairy, and rich in olive oil, nuts, fish, beans, fruits and vegetables. The study ran for six weeks.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
The New York Times

Acid Reflux? Try Going Vegetarian

September 07, 2017
  A mostly vegetarian diet may provide relief similar to widely used medications for people with acid reflux, a new study suggests. The study looked at close to 200 patients at one medical center who had been diagnosed with laryngopharyngeal reflux. It's a condition where stomach acids habitually back up into the throat, and it's distinct from the much better-known gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) -- or what most people call heartburn. People with laryngopharyngeal reflux usually don't have heartburn, explained Dr. Craig Zalvan, the lead researcher on the new study. Instead, they have symptoms like hoarseness, chronic sore throat, persistent coughing, excessive throat clearing and a feeling of a lump in the throat. Still, the problem is often treated with GERD drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs include prescription and over-the-counter drugs like Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium, and they rank among the top-selling medications in the United States. PPIs do help some people with laryngopharyngeal reflux, said Zalvan. He's chief of otolaryngology at Northwell Health System's Phelps Hospital, in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
Health Day

Why The Mediterranean Diet Is The Best Cure For Acid Reflux: Study Found Patients Who Ate Plenty Of Fish And Veg Had Fewer Symptoms And Avoided Side E

September 07, 2017
  Sticking to a Mediterranean diet is just as effective at controlling reflux as medicines prescribed to millions of people each year, research suggests. Patients who ate primarily fish, vegetables and whole grains - and drank alkaline-heavy water - reported a greater reduction in their symptoms than those on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), the small study found.

NYMC Faculty: Craig H. Zalvan, M.D., associate professor of clinical otolaryngology
Daily Mail