Department of Pathology

Doctor of Philosophy - Ph.D.

Pathology Home | Programs
Links | Events | Faculty | Contact Us
 

 
 

Doctor of Philosophy--Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0408)

The Ph.D. program in Experimental Pathology focuses on the comprehensive study of the causes and pathogenic mechanisms involved in human disease. Its educational program is designed to foster analytical problem-solving within the wide range of the basic medical sciences. Training in departmental research laboratories complements this approach and provides a vigorous multidisciplinary milieu for a research career in the biomedical sciences.

The hallmark of the doctoral program leading to the Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology is development of laboratory research skills that prepare the student for a career in basic biomedical research on human disease. A wide range of departmental research laboratories (including the College’s Brander Cancer Research Institute) making use of state-of-the-art molecular genetic, immunologic, and flow cytometric methodologies is available for the student’s dissertation research. Special areas of research interest include examination of the underlying mechanisms involved in biochemical toxicology, cancer cell biology, cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, cell dysfunction after neurologic trauma, chemical carcinogenesis, free-radical pathobiology, hypersensitivity and chronic inflammation, molecular genetics of human hypertension, Lyme disease, tuberculosis, and tissue engineering. Departmental faculty are also active collaborators in a number of national and international research programs.

Students participate in laboratory research each semester, acquiring skills and experience for developing a program of supervised independent research for the doctoral dissertation. Journal Club (PATH–8010) is taken each semester by all Ph.D. students in residence in pathology. Students also register for appropriate research activity each semester in residence – viz., research rotation (BMS-9110 or PATH-9110), pre-dissertation research training (PATH-9200), or doctoral dissertation research (PATH-9900).

 

Entry through the Integrated Ph.D. Program

Required Courses
General Biochemistry I & II (BIOC-1010*, -1020) 8 credits
Biochemistry of Gene Expression (BIOC-1250) 4 credits
CELL 1360 (136) Cell Biology 3 credits
Fundamentals of Cell Physiology (PHYS-1011*) 1 credits
PATH 1410 (441) General Pathology 6 credits
PATH 1090 (409)  Systemic Pathology 3 credits
Responsible Conduct of Research (BMS-2020*) 2 credits
Life in Biomedical Research (BMS-3510*, -3520*) 4 credits
Statistics for Basic Medical Sciences (BMS-1200*) 2 credits
*required as part of the Integrated Ph.D. Program core curriculum.
 
TOTAL 
 

33 credits

Students must also complete three different research rotations (BMS-9110) during the integrated first year.

Entry with advanced standing

Required Courses
CELL 1360 (136) Cell Biology 3 credits
General Biochemistry I & II (BIOC-1010*, -1020) 8 credits
Biochemistry of Gene Expression (BIOC-1250) 4 credits
PATH 1410 (441) General Pathology 6 credits
PATH 1090 (409)  Systemic Pathology 3 or 8 credits
BMS 1200 (900) Introduction to Biostatistics or Statistics for Basic Medical Sciences (BMS–1300) 2 or 3 credits
Responsible Conduct of Research (BMS-2020*) 2 credits
Electives (didactic credits only) 0 - 5 credits
TOTAL 
33 credits

During their first year, students undertake at least two research rotations (PATH-9110) in different laboratories in order to gain an appreciation of different areas and strategies of investigation and to determine a suitable dissertation advisor. The number of rotations may be reduced based on the student’s prior laboratory experience.

Qualifying Examination

All candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to pass a comprehensive Ph.D. qualifying examination administered by the program faculty at the end of the second year of study. Students entering with advanced standing and MD/PhD students may take the examination at an earlier point in their study if they are ready.

Candidacy

The student is eligible to enter doctoral candidacy after successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the accumulation of at least 29 didactic credits including all required courses, and the recommendation of the program faculty.

 

M.D./Ph.D. Candidates

Cell Biology (CELL-1360) 3 credits
Biochemistry of Gene Expression (BIOC-1250) 4 credits
Responsible Conduct of Research (BMS-2020) 2 credits

Total

9 credits

During their first year in residence in the experimental pathology program, students undertake at least two research rotations (PATH-9110) in different laboratories in order to gain an appreciation of different areas and strategies of investigation and to determine a suitable dissertation advisor. The number of rotations may be reduced based on the student’s prior laboratory experience.

Qualifying Examination

All candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to pass a comprehensive Ph.D. qualifying examination administered by the program faculty at the end of the second year of study. Students entering with advanced standing and MD/PhD students may take the examination at an earlier point in their study if they are ready.

Candidacy

The student is eligible to enter doctoral candidacy after successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the accumulation of at least 29 didactic credits including all required courses, and the recommendation of the program faculty.

   

NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE
Basic Sciences Building
Valhalla, New York 10595