NYMC > School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) > SHSP Academics > Degrees > M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology (S.L.P.) > Student Outcome Data

Student Outcome Data

Our program prepares skilled clinicians who are committed to excellence in the delivery of speech-language pathology services in health care facilities and other professional settings. Although we are medically oriented, the program provides a quality generalized training that prepares new clinicians for practice in any setting.

We offer the NYS Certificate for Teacher of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD).

Completion of the program leads to qualification for licensure and credentials necessary for entry into the profession. In addition to preparing graduates to meet the healthcare needs of many populations in a variety of settings, the program is a regional resource for information and continuing professional education in speech-language pathology.

 

A Graduation Rate of…

100% (35 of 35)

in 2016

 

100% (31 of 31)

in 2015

 

100% (27 of 27)

in 2014
     

A Praxis Pass Rate of…

100% (34 of 34)

in 2016

 

100% (32 of 32)

in 2015

 

96% (28 of 29)

in 2014
     

An Employment Rate of…

100% (33 of 33) – 94% response rate

in 2016

 

100% (20 of 20) – 64% response rate

in 2015

 

100% (26 of 26) -
96% response rate

in 2014

 

Some examples from the field: 

Michele Zucker Saunders '01, a graduate of our very first class, published a set of communication activity books designed for speech-language pathologists and special educators who work with children on the autism spectrum. The six-volume series, titled Autism and PDD: Things I Can Say and Do, was published by LinquiSystems in August 2006. Michele is a speech-language pathologist in the Haverstraw-Stony Point school district in Rockland County, New York. 

Allyson Castellano '06 and Jennifer Pabon '06 delivered a presentation at the 46th annual NYSSLHA Convention in Saratoga, N.Y., in April 2006. Their talk, A metabolic imbalance: Implications for oral facial clefting and cognitive changes in the elderly, grew out of their clinical experiences with neonatal and geriatric populations at Westchester Medical Center.