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Drs. Gabor & Harriette Kaley Lecture in Physiology

  

History

Gabor Kaley, Ph.D., served on the NYMC faculty for 43 years.  A member of the faculty since 1964, he helped establish GSBMS, and became chairman of the Department of Physiology in 1970. Until he stepped down from that post in 2007, he had the distinction of being the longest sitting chair of physiology in the nation. 

Born in Budapest, Hungary, Gabor Kaley first studied medicine, but when war intervened, he was sent to a labor camp in Yugoslavia where only 600 of the 6,000 inmates survived, After the war, he boarded a ship for America where he worked as a busboy, cab driver and singing waiter to pay for his studies. After receiving a B.S. in biology at Columbia University, he was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Korean War, and later used the GI Bill to earn an M.S. in physiology from New York University and a Ph.D. in experimental pathology.

During his career Dr. Kaley wrote more than 150 articles, edited an authoritative three-volume edition of Microcirculation, gave invited lectures around the world and served on the editorial boards of numerous scientific journals. A member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, he was awarded the Semmelweis Medal in 1982 for his work in microcirculation. In 2001 he received the Wiggers Memorial Award, which recognizes outstanding and lasting contributions to cardiovascular research. He received the Eugene M. Landis Award from the Microcirculatory Society in 1994 and was named the George E. Brown Memorial Lecturer by the Council on Circulation of the American Heart Association in 1998. In 2005, he was named an Eminent Physiology by the American Physiological Society. The honor resulted in a videotaped interview with Dr. Kaley about his life, achievements and vision of the future of physiology, a record that is now housed in the society’s historical archives.

In addition to the scientific legacy he left behind, Dr. Kaley’s widow, Dr. Harriette Kaley, and their son David Kaley, are continuing to support the development of cutting edge science at New York Medical College by establishing the Drs. Gabor and Harriette Kaley Endowed Lectureship in the Department of Physiology. They have also funded a research effort in the department designed to study the role of microcirculation in Alzheimer’s disease.


Previous lectures

      May 1, 2017 - “Cardiac Sensory Endings in Heart Failure: It’s Not Just About the Pain"
Fabio A. Recchia, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Physiology, Sant’Anna School of Advance Studies - Pisa (Italy)
Adjunct Professor of Physiology, Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine
       
       April 14, 2016 - “Cardiac Sensory Endings in Heart Failure: It’s Not Just About the Pain"
Irving Zucker, Ph.D. ’72
Theodore F. Hubbard Professor of Cardiovascular Research
Chairman of Cellular and Integrative Physiology in the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology,
University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha
Editor-in-Chief, The American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology
       
    November 20, 2014 - "Molecular Machines of Cell Signaling: Transporters, GPCRs” 
Harel Weinstein, D.Sc.
Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Chairman of the Department of Physiology and Biophysics
Director of the Institute for Computational Biomedicine
Chair of the Graduate Program in Physiology, Biophysics and Systems Biology
Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University
       
    October 3, 2013 - “Inflammation, Immunity and Hypertension”
David G. Harrison, M.D.
Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University