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Stepinac High School's New Honors Academy Empowers Students with Unique Real-World Learning Experiences

January 14, 2017

From gaining a rare inside look about how one of the nation’s top hospitals runs to witnessing a day in the life of a judge of a major municipal family court house, the inaugural group of Stepinac High School’s Honors Academy students has been enjoying unique learning experiences this school year. The journey to becoming a physician was also shared by Stepinac Alumnus '06, Robert Tambone, SOM Class of 2017, who is completing his last year at New York Medical College. He visited his alma mater and met with health science academy students to discuss his personal experience about the process of getting selected for an internship.

NYMC Student: Robert Tambone, SOM Class of 2017

Rivertowns Patch.com

New Directors at NYMC’s Long-Term Care Center

January 13, 2017

Dr. Robert W. Amler, dean of New York Medical College’s School of Health Sciences and Practice and vice president for government affairs, has named Kenneth Knapp, assistant professor of health policy and management, and Hasanat Alamgir, associate professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management, as co-directors of the Center for Long-Term Care, formerly called the Center for Long-Term Care Policy and Research.

Faculty Members:
Kenneth Knapp, Ph.D., assistant professor, health policy and management and co-director, the Center for Long-Term Care
Hasanat Alamgir, M.B.A., Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management and co-director, the Center for Long-Term Care
Robert W. Amler, M.D., M.B.A., dean of the School of Health Sciences and Practice and vice president for government affairs

The Business Journal

Tear Your Meniscus? This “Living Bandage” May Help

January 10, 2017

British researchers along with Howard J. Luks, M.D., assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery, are using a newly patented technique involving stem cells to repair the common knee injury. In Smithsonian Magazine's "Tear Your Meniscus? This 'Living Bandage' May Help," Dr. Luks acknowledges that the results do show some promise.

Faculty Members: 
Howard J. Luks, M.D., assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery

Smithsonian Magazine

The Smart Trick Kendall Jenner Uses to Calm Her Anxiety

January 09, 2017

Doing breathing exercises is an expert-recommended natural remedy for anxiety that has been proven to work. When someone's keyed up, they start taking quicker, more shallow breaths, which increases the body's stress response even more, explained Patricia Gerbarg, MD, assistant clinical professor in psychiatry at New York Medical College, in a previous interview with Health. Slowing breathing to about five inhales and exhales per minute helps quiet anxiety fast, she said.

Faculty Member: Patricia Gerbarg, M.D., clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

Health

Dr. Susan W. Fox Takes The Helm At Westchester Institute For Human Development

January 04, 2017

The Westchester Institute for Human Development (WIHD) Board of Directors welcomes Susan Fox, Ph.D. as President and Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Fox succeeds Dr. Ansley Bacon, who retired last year after successfully leading WIHD for the past 30 years. Dr. Bacon was recently appointed Professor Emeritus in the School of Health Science and Practice at New York Medical College.

Faculty Members: 
Susan W. Fox, Ph.D., director of the Center on Disability and Health in the School of Health Sciences and Practice and associate professor of health policy and management (appointment pending)
Ansley Bacon, Ph.D., professor emeritus, Institute of Public Health

 

Pleasantville Patch

Scary Medical Symptoms You Shouldn't Worry About

January 04, 2017

Have you ever phoned your doctor about a sudden medical concern­, one that had you predicting a trip to the hospital, emergency surgery, or even impending death? When an apparently healthy body malfunctions in an unexpected or mysterious way, many people fear the worst. But sometimes there's a simple explanation for worrisome symptoms.

Faculty Member: Marvin Lipman, M.D., professor emeritus of medicine

Consumer Reports

Heal to the Chief: A History of America’s Presidential Physicians

January 04, 2017

Please join William H. Frishman, M.D., the Barbara and William Rosenthal professor and chairman of the Department of Medicine, and professor of pharmacology, as he shares his insights into the fascinating relationship between America's presidents and their personal physicians.

Faculty Member: William H. Frishman, M.D., the Barbara and William Rosenthal professor and chairman of the Department of Medicine, and professor of pharmacology

Crain’s New York Business

Biotech Boom Fueling Office Market Growth in Westchester

January 01, 2017

The road to Westchester’s future is lined with sprawling biotechnology campuses — at least in the eyes of commercial developers and local government officials. Given the massive projects in the pipeline that will house modern labs and high-tech facilities for what are called “life sciences” companies, that seems to be an accurate assessment.

NYMC Mention: Randi D. Schwartz, M.B.A., director, BioInc@NYMC and associate dean for academic administration, School of Medicine

 

The Real Deal

Celebrity Deaths, the New Year and Grief

December 30, 2016

"Performers’ roles in our lives are very important, evoking admiration and complex emotional responses. It is perfectly reasonable and normal to feel loss...," said Shawna G. Newman, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares her insight on celebrity deaths in WebMD.

Faculty Member: Shawna G. Newman, M.D., adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

WebMD

Can You Really Die of a Broken Heart?

December 30, 2016

“Broken heart syndrome — which is, in fact, a real thing — is when someone finds out some shocking news, typically terrible news, and there’s a massive release of these stress hormones that are released into the bloodstream, and the heart is then bombarded with these stress hormones,” said Matthew W. Lorber, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, in FOX 61's "Can You Really Die of a Broken Heart?"

Faculty Member: 
Matthew W. Lorber, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences

FOX 61

10 Medical Schools With the Most African-Americans

July 26, 2016

Many medical schools struggle with creating a diverse student body, and few instiutions have a substantial representation of African-American doctors in training. Here are the 10 schools with the highest number of African-American students for the 2015-2016 school year.  

U.S. News & World Report